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Excessive heat watch for San Joaquin County

Excessive heat watch for San Joaquin County

The National Weather Service predicts increasing temperatures over 100 degrees that will last for the next several days and into next week throughout the region.

Temperatures this hot can cause undue stress on the human body, as well as pets and livestock. A prolonged period of hot temperatures may lead to the serious medical conditions of heat stroke or heat exhaustion. Public health officials urge the public to be prepared and take precautions to prevent heat stress. San Joaquin County Health Officer, Dr. Karen Furst emphasizes, “Heat stress can result in heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, or heat rashes, so it is also important to be aware of dangerous heat related symptoms.”

Air quality deteriorates as ozone levels climb

Air quality deteriorates as ozone levels climb

Rising ozone levels throughout the San Joaquin Valley are causing air quality to deteriorate, and local air officials urge residents to take health-protective measures where necessary.

Typical summer meteorological conditions are ideal for ozone (smog) formation, which officials expect to continue through Thursday.

The District has developed a valuable tool to help residents stay informed about air quality in their area. The Real-Time Air Advisory Network (RAAN) is a free, automated data delivery service that links the subscriber’s computer to an air monitor of choice. (For more information and to subscribe to RAAN, visit http://www.valleyair.org/Programs/RAAN/raan_landing.htm).

San Joaquin County Public Health Officials Urge Residents to Take Precautions for Hot Weather

San Joaquin County Public Health Officials Urge Residents to Take Precautions for Hot Weather

Temperatures in San Joaquin County are predicted to rise above 100 degrees this week. Local public health officials are urging the public to take precautions to prevent heat stress. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, each year more people in the United States die from extreme heat than from hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, floods and earthquakes combined.

Air officials urge fireworks restraint

Air officials urge fireworks restraint

Emissions from annual activity pose preventable health threat

As the Fourth of July approaches, Valley Air District officials urge Valley residents to consider the effect of fireworks on their own and their neighbors’ health.

Fireworks emit large quantities of dangerous particulate matter (PM), pumping airborne material, including soot, ash and metals, in the Valley’s air. This type of pollution causes serious health effects, including lung infections, bronchitis and cardiac illness. People with existing respiratory conditions, elderly people and small children are especially susceptible.

The increase in PM also jeopardizes the Valley’s progress in meeting health-based air-quality standards.

Winds prompt health caution in San Joaquin Valley

Winds prompt health caution in San Joaquin Valley

to gusty northwest winds across the northern San Joaquin Valley have prompted local air-pollution officials to issue a health cautionary statement through this evening. These winds are forecast to strengthen across the western parts of the District later this afternoon.

Winds in the northern and western part of the San Joaquin Valley may produce areas of localized blowing dust. Blowing dust can result in unhealthy concentrations of particulate matter 10 microns and smaller, or PM10.

Exposure to particle pollution can cause serious health problems, aggravate lung disease, trigger asthma attacks and acute bronchitis, and increase risk of respiratory infections. For people with heart disease, short-term exposure to particle pollution has been linked to heart attacks and arrhythmia, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Residents in these areas are advised to use caution through this evening.

Stockton recycling plant a ‘showcase factory’

Stockton recycling plant a ‘showcase factory’

Californians throw out hundreds of thousands of “obsolete” televisions, computers, monitors and other electronic devices every year.

That is a lot of plastic, metal, glass, lead, gold and other materials used to make those electronics – far too much to go into our already brimming landfills.

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City of Stockton Dedication Ceremony Delta Water Supply Project Water Treatment Plant

City of Stockton Dedication Ceremony Delta Water Supply Project Water Treatment Plant

City of Stockton will hold a dedication ceremony for the new Delta Water Supply Project Water Treatment Plant, Wednesday, May 30, 2012, at 4:00 pm.  The ceremony, which is free and open to the public, will be held outside the new administration and operations building of the water treatment plant, 11373 N. Lower Sacramento Road, Lodi.  Parking is available along the main entrance road entering the facility.

Located on 60 acres north of Eight Mile Road, the new water treatment plant is built to the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver standards. The site features natural lighting to reduce power demands, solar panels to provide clean renewable energy and drought tolerant landscaping. 

The 30 million gallon per day water treatment plant uses state-of-the-art processes to ensure the drinking water meets or exceeds the highest water quality standards required by State and Federal law.